FALLAIZE; Matthew James

Go down

FALLAIZE; Matthew James

Post by GD on Sat 17 Mar 2012, 5:12 pm

Manifesto to follow..


......THE BOSS......

"Always be yourself because the people who mind don't matter, and the people who matter don't mind"

avatar
GD

Male
Number of posts : 10122
Location : Channel Islands
Job/hobbies : Website Forums...lol
Humor : Anything that makes me laugh
Registration date : 2008-03-06

http://www.vuedesisles.com

Back to top Go down

Re: FALLAIZE; Matthew James

Post by GD on Sat 17 Mar 2012, 6:33 pm



I’d like to introduce myself and share with you a brief outline of my policies.
My name is Matt Fallaize. I am 30 years old. Nikki and I have been married for seven years. We have two children: Joshua, who is five and in his first year at Vale Infants’ School, and Amelia, who is two. Nikki manages our small family business: the Army & Navy Stores at Albecq.

I have been a member of the States of Deliberation as one of your representatives since 2008, when I was elected as the island’s youngest deputy. I am now seeking re-election and respectfully request that you consider casting one of your votes for me when the Vale goes to the polls on 18th April.

My objectives if re-elected in 2012

• To secure the island’s prosperity through sustainable economic growth, stable inflation and low unemployment.

• To provide the conditions in which a dynamic private sector can flourish alongside a strong public sector providing vital services and infrastructure.

• Addressing the structural deficit in public finances through a combination of further efficiency savings and raising additional revenue fairly and transparently while keeping taxes as low as reasonably possible for families and businesses.

• Pre-school education for all children, funded through a public/private partnership.

• Linking the minimum wage to increases in average earnings.

• Supporting initiatives to adapt to the challenges of energy and climate change.

• To improve scrutiny and oversight of government through the Scrutiny Committee.

• To assert the parliamentary role of the States by continuing to pursue an agenda of reform through the States Assembly and Constitution Committee.

If re-elected, I will not forget the people who put me in the States. I will continue to be available seven days a week, making as much time as necessary for duties to parishioners.

241333

mattfallaize@cwgsy.net

www.mattfallaize.com


Last edited by GD on Thu 22 Mar 2012, 12:48 pm; edited 1 time in total


......THE BOSS......

"Always be yourself because the people who mind don't matter, and the people who matter don't mind"

avatar
GD

Male
Number of posts : 10122
Location : Channel Islands
Job/hobbies : Website Forums...lol
Humor : Anything that makes me laugh
Registration date : 2008-03-06

http://www.vuedesisles.com

Back to top Go down

Re: FALLAIZE; Matthew James

Post by Diddycoon on Sun 18 Mar 2012, 12:10 pm

Good luck to my mate Matt - You fully deserve another term in the States.


Ant and Dec's biggest fan........in the world



www.officialantanddec.com "My boys own web-page"

A self confessed Next-A-Holic

A self confessed Shop-A-Holic and Bargain hunter!
A self confessed clean-a-holic
Coldplay rule the world
avatar
Diddycoon

Female
Number of posts : 4775
Location : Guernsey
Registration date : 2008-03-11

Back to top Go down

Re: FALLAIZE; Matthew James

Post by GD on Sat 24 Mar 2012, 12:11 am

Dear Vale voter

I have been a member of the States of Deliberation as one of your representatives since 2008, when I was elected as the island’s youngest deputy. I am now seeking re-election and respectfully request that you consider casting one

of your votes for me when the Vale goes to the polls on 18th April.

This manifesto outlines my record as a Vale deputy since 2008 and explains the principles and policies I will pursue over the next four years if you elect me for a second term.

“If re-elected, I will continue to work full-time and with absolute commitment and integrity on your behalf.”

I am walking the parish throughout the five weeks of this election campaign to hand deliver this manifesto and meet as many parishioners as possible. But if you wish to discuss any issue further, please do not hesitate to contact me at your convenience on 241333, by e-mail at mattfallaize@cwgsy.net or by visiting my website at www.mattfallaize.com

My Background

I was born just off The Bridge, a stone’s throw from the

St Sampson’s/Vale parish boundary. We moved to the Vale when I was six and I have lived in this parish ever since. I was educated at Vale School and Elizabeth College.

I am 30 years old. Nikki and I have been married for seven years. We have two children: Joshua, who is five and in his first year at Vale Infants’ School, and Amelia, who is two.

Nikki manages our small family business: the Army & Navy Stores at Albecq.


Tax reform

The present States must bear some responsibility for perpetuating the unfair and imbalanced taxation policies introduced by its predecessor.

Morally few of us could defend the company tax rate of zero per cent, especially when its benefits are generally not enjoyed by the owners of local firms, whose distributed profits are effectively still taxed at 20% and whose social insurance contributions have

been increased.

However, I reluctantly accepted that not introducing a zero rate would have


Although I am convinced that the States needs to raise more revenue, I will not support piling additional taxes and charges needlessly on those on fixed or low incomes or middle-income families. I have demonstrated my commitment to stand up for greater justice in our tax system, for example by supporting social insurance personal allowances for non-employed pensioners, arguing against ‘user pays’ charges as an alternative to taxes on income and profit, and persuading Social Security to raise the upper earnings limit so that almost everyone now pays a fair share of contributions on their earnings.


Capital spending & the borrowing debate

In 2009, I led a group of five deputies in successfully defeating proposals for the island to borrow £175 million.

We wrote a 60-page document which set out two alternative methods of funding capital projects without the need to burden future generations with debt.

If re-elected, I will continue to argue against borrowing to fund public services and capital projects without a secure, associated income stream.


undermined our primary industry and, by extension, our prosperity. And I remain sceptical that discussions with the European Union will end with our being able to re-introduce meaningful rates of tax on company profits without compromising the competitiveness

of large parts of our finance industry. Moreover, I believe that it is becoming less and less credible for the Policy

I hope Guernsey can avoid GST

(goods and services tax), partly because of its likely effects on inflation and the island’s competitiveness, but primarily because it would shift more of the tax burden onto those least able to afford it.


Council to wait for Brussels to reach a settled view on the matter before undertaking further tax reform locally.

If re-elected, I will try to advance the case that the company tax base is too narrow and that companies trading in Guernsey and owned by non-resident shareholders are making an insufficient contribution to public finances.


I hope Guernsey can avoid GST (goods and services tax), partly because of

its likely effects on inflation and the island’s competitiveness, but primarily because it would shift more of the tax burden onto those least able to afford it.

We have a duty to raise sufficient revenue to develop our community infrastructure and provide the vital public services our people need. But it is also best for the families and businesses of Guernsey that taxes are kept as low as reasonably possible. If re-elected, I will strive to find the right balance.


However, parishioners should not mistake my reluctance to burden future generations with debt for a willingness to accept under-investment in the island’s basic infrastructure.

The alternative funding proposals which my colleagues and I successfully put forward still provided for the States to undertake arguably the most ambitious programme of capital investment in modern times. And I fully support

the objective of the States to increase annual expenditure on capital projects to a sum equivalent to 3% of the size of the island’s economy.


Economic conditions and public finances

The economic objectives of the States must be to secure the island’s prosperity through:

• Sustainable economic growth;

• Stable inflation; and

• Low unemployment.

What is best for business is not always necessarily best for Guernsey. However, without a strong economy government will not have the revenue to pursue social welfare programmes or invest in the vital public services and
infrastructure upon which we all depend.

Economic prosperity is so important primarily because it sustains employment - and unemployment is the single greatest human cost of economic failure

Government on its own cannot create economic success. What government can do is help provide the conditions in which the dynamic private sector can flourish alongside a strong public sector.

The economic policies of successive States to some extent have helped to create such conditions, which in turn has enabled Guernsey to withstand the global crisis of recent years relatively well.

Our economy is growing again, albeit slowly, and inflation is stable. However, the next States must be careful not to develop policies which

depress economic growth while trading conditions remain challenging and while the labour market is so fragile

– because unemployment is the single greatest human cost of economic failure.

Public finances

I am disappointed that ministers have not acted with greater purpose to rebalance public finances, which were weakened considerably when the previous States was required to reform its company tax regime.

Although public finances are improving very slightly, every year the States is still spending around £30 million more than it is raising. The true size of the deficit is even greater, but it is obscured by the States repeatedly failing to meet in full its commitments in respect of capital expenditure. And it is not satisfactory to rely upon ambitious rates of economic growth and squeezing expenditure on services to balance the books.

In 2010, I successfully moved an amendment which directed the Policy Council to report to the States with a plan to bring income and expenditure back into balance. If re-elected, I will continue to make the case for prompt action to restore the health of public finances because it is unwise to maintain such a structural deficit.

Revenue spending

If re-elected, I will continue to support those elements of an on-going programme of savings which are concerned with eliminating waste, duplication and inefficiency. And I am very open-minded about saving money in other ways, for example: ending some universal benefits, reforming the public sector pension scheme, realigning capacity to demand in the primary schools sector, selling States property and assets and reviewing subsidies paid to external organisations.

I recognise fully that, in order to help fund some of the social and

environmental policies in this manifesto, it will be necessary to make difficult decisions to cut spending in areas of lower priority.

However, Guernsey already spends considerably less on public services than its two most comparable jurisdictions, Jersey and the Isle of Man. And over the past few years States expenditure has fallen in relation to the size of
our economy.

I believe it would be imprudent in the present climate to advocate a return to the days when the States might have expected expenditure to grow well above the rate of inflation. However, once public finances are brought back into balance, I believe that the States should consider relaxing the policy to freeze expenditure in real terms – in order to protect and then improve vital public services.

I will be hugely disappointed if the next States does not provide the investment finally to deliver universal

pre-school education through a public/ private partnership.

Social welfare

There is compelling evidence to demonstrate that social wellbeing – from life expectancy to mental illness, crime to educational underachievement, housing to relative poverty – is affected partly by how wealthy a society is and partly by how equal its people are. The same evidence tells us that huge gaps between the rich and poor are bad for everyone, including the well-off.

My vision for social welfare is the same as that put forward recently by the Social Security Department:

• increased focus on demanding personal responsibility of those who are able to work because the best route out of poverty is financial independence achieved through employment; but

• providing lower-income individuals and families with all the support
and financial assistance necessary to guarantee every household a socially acceptable minimum standard of living.

Education

In 2008, I successfully proposed a requête which scrapped the policy of the previous States to introduce student contributions to higher education (i.e. student loans).

I sat on the higher education working party between 2009 and 2011. Working with a small but dedicated team of staff, we maintained student grants so as not to discourage youngsters from accessing higher education, negotiated a fair deal with universities at a time when they were increasing their fees for UK students and actually delivered budget savings in real terms by managing the grants schemes more wisely.

If re-elected, I will continue to oppose any attempts to pass more of the costs of higher education onto students.

I also sat on a working party which made progress towards designing a scheme of universal access to pre-school education. Early in the life of the next States, the Department should be able to present proposals to entitle every child to between 15 and 20 hours a week of pre-school learning through a public/private partnership.

Studies indicate that for every pound spent on pre-school education, the state can save up to five times as much later in avoiding various economic and social problems. I will be hugely disappointed if the next States does not provide the investment necessary finally to deliver universal pre-school education.

If re-elected, the rebuilding of La Mare de Carteret School will be my first priority when the States debates the next phase of its capital prioritisation programme. However, new buildings alone are not enough of course. The Mulkerrin Report made a strong case for structural and policy reform in some areas of the education service and in my view that should be pursued as the first priority of the Department after this election.

Healthcare and bowel cancer screening

In 2009 and 2010, I proposed the introduction of bowel cancer screening and paying for it by making savings

in areas of lower priority. Both amendments, though lost, helped advance the case for this vital service and in 2011 a comprehensive screening programme was introduced.

Health inflation continues to run above the rate of ordinary inflation, meaning that unless the States spends more

on health in real terms every year the quality and scope of services will inevitably decline. In the long-term, healthcare in Guernsey will probably

need to be re-organised quite radically in order to deliver good-quality services in an affordable way. In the meantime, if re-elected I will continue to support increased spending for health and social care in the full knowledge that other areas of lower priority will need to make additional savings.
Minimum wage

The present States deserves credit for legislating for a minimum wage. If re-elected, I will propose linking the

minimum wage to increases in earnings, so that workers on the lowest rung

of the economic ladder can benefit when wages increase in the rest of the economy.

Pensions

I backed proposals gradually to raise the retirement age. Although not universally popular, it was preferable to the other two options: raising

the contribution rate for everyone, including those least able to afford it, or allowing the value of pensions to decline in the years ahead.

At present, the state pension is increased every year at 1% above the rate of inflation. In order to save

money, some politicians have suggested reducing such increases, a move which I oppose. Indeed, if ever resources allow, my long-term aspiration would be to increase the state pension in line with earnings (usually about 2% above inflation) so that pensioners do not lose ground relative to the working population.

Housing

Successive administrations deserve credit for alleviating the housing crisis which emerged during the 1980s and 90s. The Department’s flagship policy – the Corporate Housing Programme – has my full support.

However, over the past decade there has been an increase in the numbers of people on the waiting list for housing support. And the ‘purchase price to earnings’ index demonstrates that over the same period housing locally has become even less affordable.

I remain of the view that for too long the States has tried to address the island’s housing challenges using just one initiative at a time. As soon as resources allow, I would wish to see a broader mix of policies pursued simultaneously, including actually building some States’ homes.

Population

I am broadly supportive of proposals to replace housing control legislation with a system based on work and residency permits. I am optimistic that in time the reforms will provide a more effective way of influencing the size and make-up of the population and fulfilling the States objective to maintain relatively steady population numbers overall.

Encouraging significant population growth would not resolve the demographic challenges of the future – indeed, it would likely put us on a population escalator with no way of getting off. It would also place unsustainable demands on our infrastructure and services.

However, there is little doubt that maintaining a generally prosperous economy while a shrinking workforce supports an increasing number of pensioners – and achieving it without substantial population growth – is a complex challenge. I believe it can be done, but not without taking some risks in policy-making and probably foregoing some benefits many of us currently enjoy.


I want the Social Security Department to look into the feasibility of the States facilitating ‘second pillar’ pensions as a way to supplement the conventional state pension as demographics change and the number of pensioners rises

in proportion to the working-age population.


The present States deserves credit for legislating for a minimum wage. If re-elected, I will propose linking the minimum wage

to increases in average earnings, so that workers on the lowest rung of the economic ladder can benefit when wages increase in the rest of the economy.

Consideration of our environment will be core to all policy decisions and actions. Environmental policy will be equal, not subservient, to economic and social policy.


In 2009, I enthusiastically supported a successful amendment which included the words above. They were designed to put the environment at the heart of all decision-making in government. Some of the actions of the present

States have fulfilled that commitment; others perhaps less so.

Solid waste

I voted against mass burn incineration whenever realistic alternatives existed.

And I helped write the amendment which defeated on-island mass burn and directed the development of the more progressive waste strategy which the States has recently adopted.

In 2003, the island was close to building a 70,000-tonne incinerator. In 2010, we were on the verge of agreeing to an incinerator to deal with between 37,000 and 54,000 tonnes. Now – because

we are winning the argument to put much more emphasis on prevention, minimisation, re-use and recycling of waste – there is a realistic prospect of reducing residual waste to around 20,000 tonnes per year and disposing of that much smaller amount in a smarter way than on-island mass burn incineration.

I am slightly sceptical about the case for exporting waste in its pre-treated residual form. If that option is not pursued, I would probably favour a mechanical biological treatment plant (MBT) producing a stabilised product or a refuse derived fuel (RDF) to export.

If re-elected, I will vote against any attempts to undo another waste strategy. We are already at the end of the period when it was realistically

possible to prevaricate. The next States needs to see through the various (and inevitably not universally popular) policy and legislative measures

which will be necessary to realise the ambitious new waste strategy.


Road transport

In 2010, I laid a successful amendment which directed the Environment Department to draw up a comprehensive and integrated road transport strategy for at least the next

five years. Alas, the island is still waiting for that strategy.

I do not wish to demonise the car – my wife and I both own one and use them frequently. Many of our roads are relatively quiet much of the time. And I have no desire to see the States bully people out of their private motor vehicles.

However, I cannot agree with those who claim that there is no traffic problem in Guernsey. This is a small, densely-populated community where space is at a premium and with a road network little changed since the days of horse and cart. Therefore, I regret the development of our extraordinary dependency on the car.

I still believe that the States should lead efforts to increase the use of alternative transport. However, I am prepared

to adopt a pragmatic approach and compromise with colleagues across the political spectrum just to see in place a road transport strategy worthy of that title. It needs to be coherent so that its various elements do not conflict with each other (as they do now), securely funded and set optimistic but measurable objectives against which progress can be measured.



I am prepared to adopt a pragmatic approach to see a road transport strategy which

is coherent and securely funded.

Climate change and energy

The global scientific consensus is that the climate is changing and that man is making a significant contribution to it. Guernsey is not isolated from this challenge – not just because we want

to be good citizens, but because climate change presents practical problems for food production, coastal defences and the structure of our economy.

Of course, alone we are too small to mitigate climate change, but we will need to adapt economically, socially and environmentally as its effects become more prevalent. Adaptation to climate change will inevitably mean seeking new sources of energy, including renewables. I am not obsessed about pursuing renewable energy at all costs, but I am sympathetic to taking some calculated risks in this area and optimistic about the potential of tidal, solar and offshore wind power.

In the meantime, I remain attracted to making Guernsey ‘carbon neutral’ by sponsoring reforestation schemes.

Other Areas



I have proposed or seconded more successful amendments and requêtes than any other member over the past four years, including motions which defeated premature proposals to commercialise our publicly-owned water utility, forced the Chief Minister to seek the approval of the States Assembly before signing an agreement which set out aspects of our relationship with the UK government, and directed the next States to put in place a long-term plan for the future of the island’s dairy industry.

Of course, sometimes the States has defeated recommendations which

I initiated. For example, after a tied vote they rejected my amendment to restrict increases in States members’ pay, and after another tied vote they rejected a proposal to end secret ballots in elections of the chief minister, which I was certain would have improved openness and strengthened accountability.

I also seconded an unsuccessful amendment to require a planning inquiry ahead of the redevelopment

of the airport; I was unable to persuade the States not to establish another bureaucracy – the Law Enforcement Commission – to run policing locally; and I was defeated when I tried to prevent an increase in bus fares of

up to 67%, a decision which was soon followed by a reduction in the number of passengers for the first time in years.

Of course, losing debates can be frustrating and dispiriting. But differences of opinion between politicians are, of course, a sign of a healthy democracy. I welcome robust and challenging political debate.

I also recognise the value of building consensus with colleagues because no deputy can ever achieve anything alone.







Liquid waste

I acknowledge that because of the tidal patterns of the Little Russel, and following the findings of the recent scientific survey of our marine environment, it may not be wise at the present time to afford priority to installing full sewage treatment.

However, I still support the following words of a States Report which were written in 2007: “The existing long-sea outfall…is no longer an acceptable permanent means of disposal in any developed country.”

I voted against the recent proposal to continue pumping untreated sewage just off our coastline for two reasons. First because I genuinely believe that it harms the reputation we want as a clean island, and second because if we do not make improvements ourselves I think it is a very real possibility that in time we will be shamed or forced by others into cleaning up our waters.

My view is that we should adopt well-established international standards in respect of waste water treatment and install the equipment necessary to meet those standards as soon as resources allow. That may not mean full sewage treatment, but it would certainly require primary treatment at least.

The next States needs to see through the various policy and legislative measures which will be necessary

to realise the ambitious new waste strategy, the foundations of which I fully support.

Reform of Government

Reform of government has become one of my main areas of interest in politics.

During the last 12 months, I have led the three Parliamentary Committees in their work on ‘good governance’. We presented 50 recommendations to improve the way the States operates.

I also laid a requête before the final meeting of this States term, proposing that a fundamental review of the entire machinery of government should commence immediately after this general election. My experience in the States has made me more open-minded about the case for reform.

If re-elected, my thoughts in this area of policy will be guided by this simple priority: to strengthen radically the capacity for leadership and accountability in our system of government.

And I believe we can deliver stronger leadership and more accountability without the need for party politics and without handing sweeping powers to a small number of unaccountable ministers.

SACC & Scrutiny

I am a member of the States Assembly & Constitution Committee, which has pursued several reforms to

strengthen openness and accountability in the decision-making of the States Assembly.



I am also the vice-chairman of the Scrutiny Committee. I believe that we have developed a reputation for producing thorough, evidence-based reports, including on matters such as vandalism, the planning service,

exclusions and disruptive behaviour in schools and staff numbers and costs in the civil service.

However, scrutiny in the States remains under-resourced and structurally weak. I care passionately about scrutiny in the public administration of our island. The need to improve scrutiny – and thereby strengthen democratic accountability – is one of the main reasons that I have become convinced that the island needs to undertake another major review of its machinery of government.

Accountability

In politics, as in life, refusing ever to admit to one’s shortcomings and errors is a sign of weakness, not strength. No one is infallible; we all get things wrong occasionally. In government, when one falls short of reasonable expectations, one should take responsibility and willingly submit to whatever level of accountability is demanded by one’s colleagues and the public.

But there remains an endemic weakness in the States of Deliberation properly to hold to account those to whom it has delegated authority – another good reason for a comprehensive review of our machinery of government.



If re-elected, I will continue to be available seven days a week, making as much time as necessary

for local duties to parishioners.

My role as a parish deputy

I hope that over the past four years I have fulfilled my objective to be an

approachable, responsive and reliable deputy to Vale parishioners. I have certainly endeavoured to answer parishioners’ letters, calls and e-mails as promptly as possible and I have attended the vast majority of the deputies’ surgeries which are held on the Saturday morning the week before every

States meeting.

I have pursued personal cases for many parishioners on issues such as planning applications, social housing, access

to schools, provision of health care, road cleaning and the proliferation of phone masts. I worked closely with our dedicated parish secretary and other officials to help push for the removal of nuisance chickens first from the Vale cemetery and then from around the Vale Castle.

If re-elected, I will not forget the people who put me in the States. I will continue to be available seven days a week, making as much time as necessary for local duties to parishioners.


Listening to you...

I’ve given my ideas and policies a lot of thought in preparing for this election and I’ve explained them in detail in this manifesto.

But an election campaign is not just about candidates getting their messages out – it’s also about listening to you, the people of Guernsey, about your hopes and concerns.

Should you wish to discuss any issue, please do not hesitate to contact me at your convenience.

I should like to thank my proposer, former Vale deputy Owen Le Tissier, and my seconder, Roy Northey. I am grateful for their support and encouragement.


Vote for Matt Fallaize


Telephone 241333

E-mail mattfallaize@cwgsy.net

Address Le Coin du Marais, Les Marais Lane, Vale

www.mattfallaize.com








......THE BOSS......

"Always be yourself because the people who mind don't matter, and the people who matter don't mind"

avatar
GD

Male
Number of posts : 10122
Location : Channel Islands
Job/hobbies : Website Forums...lol
Humor : Anything that makes me laugh
Registration date : 2008-03-06

http://www.vuedesisles.com

Back to top Go down

Re: FALLAIZE; Matthew James

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum